The authoritative source on
  early churches of New Jersey

About this site
We've created a database and photographic inventory on more than half the 18th & 19th century churches in the state and add to it each month. We welcome and solicit all contributions and suggestions from our visitors.

How to use this site
Post a query
Respond to readers' queries
Consult the database
Annotate the database
Upload a photo
Suggest a church for inclusion

Glossary
List of churches, by county

Photographic notes
Links to related sites

   Photographic Inventory

Church of St. Michael's
Union City, Hudson County

The Passionist Fathers were important in establishing parishes in Jersey City, Gutenburg as well as in West Hoboken which was the original name of Union City. This is the description of St. Michael's from the Passionists' website.

St. Michael's Monastery and Church have long been a landmark on the New Jersey skyline. In 1861, at the invitation of Bishop James R. Bayley of Newark, Passionists began ministering in the diocese. By 1864 they built St. Michael's Monastery in West Hoboken ("Union City" since 1925). Additions followed in 1914, 1929, and 1944. The domed church was built in 1875 and rebuilt after a 1934 fire. Numerous parishes in Hudson County were founded and staffed by the Passionists.
St. Michael's Monastery served as provincial house, seminary, residence for priests and brothers, and as a center for novena devotions, serving Irish, German, Italian, and Spanish-speaking Catholics. Due to lack of finances and personnel, the entire complex was closed in 1981. After the ravages of a 1994 fire, the monastery structure was razed and replaced by moderate-income housing units, while the church became home to a community of Korean Presbyterians.

The monastery was completely destroyed in a fire in 1934, and only the stout walls of the church were left. It was rebuilt the following year, but closed in 1981, then sold to the Hudson Presbyterian church.

 

 

 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS  |  ABOUT US  |  HOME  

Copyright (c) 2001 Frank L. Greenagel